Monthly Archives: February 2015

The Week in UKIP

That we’re just going to skip right over the fact that a UKIP candidate asked, “What happens when renewable energy runs out?” on Thursday should give an idea of how much ridicule has been on offer for the party over the last seven days. That’s because last week British audiences were treated to not one, but TWO major documentaries on UKIP, Great Britain’s answer to the immigration question, providing the question is, “How abhorrently can we treat immigrants before we get investigated for Human Rights violations?”

The first, aired last Monday, was a docudrama that gave us the most horrifying depiction of the UK since 1984’s apocalypse-in-Sheffield odyssey Threads. Entitled UKIP: The First 100 Days, the Channel 4 show gave us an idea of what would happen if UKIP came to outright power in May and Page 3-loving cartoon turtle Nigel Farage got himself the job of Prime Minister. The show imagined a country of rising unemployment, increasing racial tension and clashes in the streets between opposing factions, with the obligatory crackdown on illegal immigrants in full effect.

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Should ISIS be illegal?

A few weeks ago Natalie Bennett was interviewed by Andrew Neil on Sunday Politics, in which she stated the Green Party’s policy of not criminalising any organisation, including ISIS. “It should NOT be a crime to join ISIS”, screamed the Daily Mail, “In an extraordinary claim, Natalie Bennett said people should not be punished for what they think and stressed it should ‘not be a crime simply to belong to an organisation’.”

Clearly the Daily Mail (just like ISIS itself) does believe you should be punished for what you think. Indeed not wanting to punish you for what you think is ‘extraordinary’. But taking a step back from the reactionary and emotive approach the press has taken, how should we treat organisations associated with terrorism?

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The Week in UKIP

So predictable they now have their own soundbite generator, Union Jack-loving Nicotine addicts UKIP continued to apologise this week for the indiscretions of their own members. Only last week, Mark Walker – a would-be UKIP candidate on the shortlist to stand in the general election – was deemed “unsuitable” by the party after he promoted an article on Facebook claiming mixed-race couples are a “plague”, and this week party candidate Donald Grewar resigned over the fact he approved of comments on a BNP website that described gay people as “perverts” and “paedophiles”. The party similarly distanced itself on Tuesday from a publication by Christian Soldiers of UKIP, a UKIP-authorised group which described a gay pride event as an “annual parade of depravity” in a recent newsletter.

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The Westminster sex abuse scandal we should all be talking about, but aren’t

In December of last year, Scotland Yard was handed a dossier by MPs containing the names of 22 high profile figures, including three current MPs and three members of the House of Lords, who it alleged were involved in a Westminster paedophile ring that operated in locations throughout the country in the 1970s and 80s. Labour MP John Mann, who spent months going through public reports about historic sex abuse cases, has said he expects the number of victims to come forward to total “many tens of thousands of people across the country”. The National Association for People Abused in Childhood, meanwhile, says politicians have been named by victims “again and again” on calls to a sex abuse helpline.

Police have also called a witness’s claims that the so-called ‘VIP sex abuse ring’ murdered three boys in front of him in the early 80s “credible and true”. ‘Nick’ told Exaro News how “he saw a former Conservative MP – before he left Parliament – strangle a boy to death during a sexual assault”, while a second child was killed “during a savage physical attack in front of a separate MP, a former Conservative cabinet minister”. A third boy was deliberately run over and killed in broad daylight as a “warning” to Nick, he says.

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A new story

Adam Curtis’s documentary ‘Bitter Lake‘ was released on iPlayer on Sunday 25th Jan – some have questioned why it has only been released on the BBC’s online streaming service, suggesting it may be “too dangerous for TV”. The documentary explores the history of the Middle East in the last century, focusing on Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia. It tells quite a different version of history than the one told to us by politicians and the media, where the West is ‘good’ and we have to fight the ‘bad guys’. The documentary, after spelling out how comprehensively we have inflamed the situation in Afghanistan by fighting everyone, concludes we need to find a different story now, because ‘good vs evil’ just isn’t cutting it.

I believe we are finding that story. Continue reading